Then and Now

While the imagery may be familiar, a lot has changed from the first Super Bowl in 1967 in Los Angeles (top) to last year’s game in Arizona (below). Photos by NFL Photos and David J. Phillip/AP Images
While the imagery may be familiar, a lot has changed from the first Super Bowl in 1967 in Los Angeles. Photos by NFL Photos and David J. Phillip/AP Images

By John Conroy

As Keith Bruce sees it, the organizing team behind San Francisco’s first Super Bowl in 31 years has rewritten the playbook for hosting the event. “Our tag line is: ‘We’re not just hosting a Super Bowl. We’re redefining it.’ We’re redefining it in a number of ways here in the Bay Area, given our DNA of innovation and invention,” said Bruce, president and CEO of the Super Bowl 50 Host Committee. “We have so much to showcase and to share here.”

Sharing will radiate from San Francisco, across the Golden Gate Bridge to the wine country north of the city, over the new Bay Bridge to Oakland and the East Bay, down the peninsula to the South Bay and the Silicon Valley stadium site in Santa Clara, and past San Jose to Monterey. The 50th Super Bowl, set for February 7 at Levi’s Stadium, “is bigger than any one city,” said Bruce, noting that it was always the intention of the NFL and the host committee to spread activity across the entire nine-county region.

To read the rest of this story in the digital edition of SportsTravel, please click here.